Posts Tagged ‘monitor’

Solid Glass Calibrations for Liquid Level Gauges

Solid Glass Gauge Tops Now Available:

tank level gauge with glass top

Liquid Level Tank Gauge with more durable solid glass top

 

The new solid glass gauge display offers the same or better physical durability as the original plastic tops. However, this new glass gauge top offers much better resistance to sun damage, heat, weathering, chemical fumes, and more.  

The new glass gauge top eliminates the discoloration and cloudiness that can sometimes occur with the original plastic tops.  

It also will not warp, no matter how much heat and sun you expose it to. 

The new glass calibration will also hold up better when exposed to more aggressive chemical conditions, such as acids, caustics, high ethanol E85, Bio Diesel, etc…  

Currently, this glass option is available on three models.  The Type D At A Glance Direct Reading Gauge, the Type H Therma Gauge, and the Type K At A Glance Leak Gauge.

The oldest most reliable mechanical gauge on the market just got better.  As always, our gauges and all the parts on our gauges are Made in the USA.  

See More Pictures – Click Here

 

Or Visit our Website:

www.ksentry.com

New Krueger Sentry Gauge Website coming soon

Some preview pics of our new web site, coming soon.

Designed by Bill Zoelle:  http://www.zoelledesign.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remote Liquid Level Gauge Monitor- Extreme Tests

LED At A Glance Remote Monitor – Liquid Level

The LED At A Glance, a remote display accessory for the Krueger line of liquid level gauges, has been put through some rigorous weather tests and has passed with flying colors.

Early in the winter season, we set up some liquid level gauges outside the shop mounted to some 55 gallon drums.  The wires for the remote level monitors were then run over to the wall and the LED At A Glance remote level gauge displays were then set up in exposed areas.

LED At A Glance Remote Monitor – Liquid Level

Luckily, (for our testing purposes anyway), we got hit with a major snow storm. (18 inches of snow, 20 below zero with windchill).

Pictured above (the first picture) you can see the exposed remote display wire encased in ice.

Pictured directly above, you can see how the remote liquid level monitor itself was totally buried in snow and then dug out.

Although we do suggest placing a hood or some other sort protection over the level monitor, in all testing cases the remote liquid level monitor still worked great after the storm went through.

Lee Speakin Geurts