Posts Tagged ‘liquid’

Solid Glass Calibrations for Liquid Level Gauges

Solid Glass Gauge Tops Now Available:

tank level gauge with glass top

Liquid Level Tank Gauge with more durable solid glass top

 

The new solid glass gauge display offers the same or better physical durability as the original plastic tops. However, this new glass gauge top offers much better resistance to sun damage, heat, weathering, chemical fumes, and more.  

The new glass gauge top eliminates the discoloration and cloudiness that can sometimes occur with the original plastic tops.  

It also will not warp, no matter how much heat and sun you expose it to. 

The new glass calibration will also hold up better when exposed to more aggressive chemical conditions, such as acids, caustics, high ethanol E85, Bio Diesel, etc…  

Currently, this glass option is available on three models.  The Type D At A Glance Direct Reading Gauge, the Type H Therma Gauge, and the Type K At A Glance Leak Gauge.

The oldest most reliable mechanical gauge on the market just got better.  As always, our gauges and all the parts on our gauges are Made in the USA.  

See More Pictures – Click Here

 

Or Visit our Website:

www.ksentry.com

Krueger Gauge News and Events

Trade Shows:

We just wrapped up the Informex Show in Miami, Florida.  I would like to thank everyone that attended our booth.  Our liquid level gauges, designed for above ground storage tanks, are a perfect fit in the volatile world of aggressive chemicals.   Our mechanical gauges are approved for use in flammable liquids, and our all stainless/ all plastic level gauge designs can hold up to nearly any type of corrosive chemical environment.

All Plastic Liquid Level Chemical Gauge

All Stainless Liquid Level Chemical Gauge

We also just finished reserving our booth at the NACS / PEI Show in Las Vegas.  Show dates are from October 8th – 10th 2014.  Our booth number is 6320.  We look forward to seeing all of our old friends at the show, and hopefully making some new ones.

Industy News:

NYC rules for non metallic AST’s

Diesel Generator Leaks. Completely Preventable with the proper gauging.

 

Newspaper Article from 1986 on Krueger Sentry Gauge

I was doing some spring cleaning and organizing, and I found a treasure trove of classic Krueger Sentry Gauge documents, articles, photos, etc…

I will be posting some of this stuff over the next few weeks/months.  Some of it dates all the way back to 1943.

First up is an old Newspaper Article from 1986, when we only had 2 full time employees and one part timer.

Krueger Sentry Gauge 70th Anniversary

Krueger Sentry Gauge Founded in 1942:
  • Archie Comics were First Released in 1942
  • Casablanca and Bambie came out in 1942
  • Harrison Ford, Paul McCartney, and Jimi Hendrix were born in 1942
  • The first digital computer known as the Atanasoff-Berry Computer, or ABC, was conceptualized in 1937. In 1942, the invention came to fruition and was built at Iowa State University. John Vincent Atanasoff and Clifford Berry created this computer. It featured binary arithmetic, dual processors, regenerative memory and separate functions for computing and memory
  • On a personal note, when I started working for Krueger Gauge in 1994 at the age of 18, no one knew what the “intra-net” really was, and now Search Engine Optimization and social networking are my primary jobs.
  • Here is a funny video from 1994 that shows how far we have come in the last 18 years. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUs7iG1mNjI
In April, Krueger Sentry Gauge celebrated their 70th year of being in business, manufacturing liquid level mechanical gauges for the petroleum industry.
The company was founded during the upheaval and uncertainty of World War II and in this time of economic ups and downs the Krueger Gauge Family is proud to not only announce our 70th anniversary, but also re-state our policy on American Made products.  Not only is our gauge manufactured in Green Bay Wisconsin, nearly every component on our gauge is sourced from American Manufacturers.  We take pride in being American Made and will continue to take this hard stance on supporting our local economy. 

We would like to thank everyone who has made this milestone possible. It is truly a blessing to have customers and vendors that Krueger Sentry Gauge can rely and depend on for support.

 

-From Lee Geurts and everyone else at Krueger Gauge

Level Gauge Web Store Tutorial

Following up the announcement of our new web store, I would like to draw your attention to this video.  I go thru the process of ordering a custom liquid level gauge using our new store.   It is a short tutorial that shows the general functionality of the custom gauge configurator.

Direct Link
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=otrIbvM99gU

Link to our new level gauge store here.

New Krueger Sentry Gauge Webstore

The new web store is live.

http://level-gauges.ksentry.com/

This link takes you to the public store, which shows list pricing/end user pricing for our level gauges.  Wholesale customers / Distributors can call us for a special wholesale login which gives access to special pricing.   Now, you can fully configure a liquid level gauge through our store, regardless of how much customizing you need to do.

A quick walk thru:

  • On the first page, you see the 4 main categories.  Level, Leak, Overfill, and Parts.  For the sake of our demonstration, click on liquid level gauges.
  • On this page, you will see the 5 different gauges we offer for reading liquid level.  Click on the Therma Gauge.
  • On the product page, you have the choice between selecting pre configured gauges, or Configure Custom Gauge.  The pre configured gauges are common part numbers and then just some random stuff.  The Configure Custom Gauge link is the cool part, so lets start there.
  • On this page, you can select every gauge option that we have available for the gauge.  Certain options eliminate other options.  So if you select an option that conflicts with another option, the system will “grey out” or “change” what you are able to select.  (Example, max tank depth is usually 144 inches.  But if you select a gauge with stainless floats, the max tank depth is reduced to 120 inches.

Broken Gauges? Order a Krueger Gauge with Gauge Guard

OSHA Cites Coomes Oil & Supply and Florida Rock & Tank Lines in August BP

Gas Station Explosion in St. Augustine

4:45 PM, Feb 21, 2012   |   0  comments

ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. — The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration today announced Coomes Oil & Supply Inc. has been cited in August’s explosion at a BP gas station.

According to an OSHA news release, a delivery driver for Florida Rock & Tank Lines was refilling an above-ground gasoline storage tank that had a broken gauge.

PICTURES: BP Gas Station Explosion

The tank overflowed. Vapors then combined with heat from the running delivery truck to trigger the explosion.

The OSHA inspection found that the gas station and Florida Rock & Tank Lines refilled the tank despite the inoperable liquid level gauging system.

OSHA has proposed a $70,000 fine be leveled against Florida Rock & Tank Lines along with a citation for one willful violation.

This violation is for “failing to provide the delivery driver to determine if the storage tank had enough capacity for additional gasoline.”

A “willful violation” is one committed with intentional knowing or voluntary disregard for the law’s requirements, according to the release.

In addition to Florida Rock & Tank Lines, Coomes Oil & Supply has also been issued a citation by OSHA.  Coomes Oil & Supply has been cited for failing to provide employees and delivery drivers a mean to determine the gasoline levels in the above-ground storage tank, a “serious violation” according to OSHA.

Read the rest of the story at the source here

Too often broken gauges are ignored for years, never being repaired or replaced, the underlying danger going unnoticed.  As the story above goes to prove, the danger is all to real.  Don’t ignore that broken gauge.

In order to prevent breakage and weathering to a gauge, order a Krueger Sentry Level Gauge with the optional inner Glass Calibration and Gauge Guard.  These two components, when combined, severely limit the possibility of weathering and breakage of your liquid level gauge.

News Story REblogged by Lee Geurts

http:www.ksentry.com

Above Ground Tank Installation- NFPA 30- Tank Storage

The following PDF is the NFPA Code for above ground storage tank (AST) installation.

Above-Ground-Tank-Installation-Relevant-NFPA-Code

On page 4, Section 4.3.2.3.3, letter C the code states the following:

Means shall be provided to prevent overfilling by sounding an alarm when the liquid level in the tank reaches 90 percent of capacity and by automatically stopping delivery of liquid to the tank when the liquid level in the tank reaches 95 percent of capacity. In no case shall these provisions restrict or interfere with the proper functioning of the normal vent or the emergency vent

Our Overfill alarms, when mounted to our standard liquid level gauge (Therma Gauge), provide a 110 DB alarm to warn that the tank is reaching capacity.  The following documents provide testing results and ordering info:

In cases where liquids are flammable and fire protection is paramount, adding the Glass Calibration and the Aluminum Lock Nut to the gauge should eliminate the plastic from the gauge and provide a glass and metal barrier between the inside of the tank and the outside.  For additional protection, upgrade the Aluminum Nut to the Gauge Guard.

Already have a Krueger Gauge and want to get it up to code.  If the gauge is fully functional, just order our upgraded Fire Protection Gauge Repair Kit  and an overfill alarm.  In the case of the kit, we will need to know what gauge type you have.  Example part number is (-”gauge type”-Kit-GLC-ALN). Both the kit and the alarm are easily retrofitted to existing Krueger Tank Gauges.

DEF Storage Tank Regulation

DEF STORAGE TANK REGULATION

Source: PEI Journal | Written by Rick Long

REGULATION OF TANKS CONTAINING DEF

BACKGROUND

Nitrogen oxide (NOx) is a major air pollutant that contributes to smog, asthma and respiratory and heart diseases. It’s a by product of diesel fuel’s high combustion temperatures, which results from the high frictional heat levels created by compressing air in the cylinders to the point at which it can ignite diesel fuel without a spark. This is unlike a gasoline engine, which uses spark ignition to burn gasoline.

Beginning in January 2010, no new on-road vehicles can be sold without meeting EPA’s tougher Tier 2 Emission Standards
for Light Duty and Heavy Duty Vehicles. The new standard is 0.2 grams of nitrogen oxide (NOx) per brake horsepower. This regulation will reduce allowable nitrogen oxide levels by 90 percent from today and by 96 percent from 1994.

While gasoline engines have no problem meeting the new standard, vehicles with diesel engines have to utilize new technology to achieve the more stringent emission regulations.

The technology most vehicle and engine manufacturers will rely on is Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR), which uses a urea-based diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) and a catalytic converter to change smog-forming nitrogen oxides into harmless nitrogen and water vapor. SCR treats exhaust gas downstream of the engine. Small quantities of DEF are injected into the exhaust upstream of a catalyst, where it vaporizes and decomposes to form ammonia and carbon dioxide. The ammonia (NH3) and SCR catalyst then convert the NOx into nitrogen and water.

COMPOSITION OF DEF

Current DEF formulations are a nontoxic, colorless and nearly odorless mixture of 32.5 percent chemical urea and 67.5 percent deionized water. Urea is the nitrogen-containing compound that transforms into ammonia when heated. Similar urea/water compounds are used in various industries, including extensive application as an agricultural fertilizer.

DEF is not a fuel; it also is neither flammable nor combustible. The product is also extremely heavy—at just over nine pounds per gallon.

STORAGE OF DEF

The industry expects diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) to be stored in small-size containers, drums, totes and intermediate bulk
containers (IBCs), as well as in bulk from both aboveground and belowground tanks.

While the initial supply of DEF will most likely be in packaged containers, larger-scale bulk storage and dispensing is just around the corner. One example suggests why: New truck models will have onboard DEF tanks capable of storing up to 20 (or more) gallons of DEF. A driver with even a mid-sized 13-gallon DEF tank would have to cart and pour almost 120 pounds of packaged DEF for a complete fill-up (13 gallons x 9.2 pounds per gallon = 119.6 pounds).

Given such realities, our industry must understand as quickly and authoritatively as possible how the federal government and
the states plan to regulate larger-scale bulk storage and dispensing of DEF. Good information will be crucial if businesses are to make sound decisions and commitments in the design of their DEF refueling operations.

ABOVEGROUND DRUMS, TOTES, IBCS, AND TANKS

Most people associated with the petroleum marketing and equipment industries know that aboveground tanks (ASTs) storing “oil” are regulated by EPA under the Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) rule. Since DEF is composed of aqueous urea which does not meet the SPCC definition of “oil,” ASTs containing DEF (including drums, totes, IBCs and tanks) are not regulated by EPA.

However, a word of caution is necessary here: Some states develop and enforce regulations that are more stringent than the federal rules. Check your state’s aboveground storage tank regulations before installing any AST containing DEF.

OVERVIEW OF FEDERAL UST PROGRAM

The federal underground storage tank (UST) regulations apply only to underground tanks and piping storing either petroleum or certain hazardous substances.

Today, the federal EPA estimates that approximately 617,000 underground storage tanks at close to 233,000 facilities operate under the federal UST program. Nearly all these USTs contain petroleum. Most estimates are that less than 10,000 tanks hold hazardous substances covered by the UST regulations.

Just as DEF does not qualify as an “oil” under EPA’s AST program, aqueous urea is not a “petroleum” substance under EPA’s UST program and therefore is not regulated as a petroleum product.

By itself, aqueous urea also falls outside of EPA’s definition of a “hazardous substance.”

Some confusion in the regulatory community develops, however, because DEF may contain up to 0.2% ammonia, and ammonia is one of about 1,200 substances identied as a hazardous substance under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). That becomes important because UST systems that store substances identied as hazardous under CERCLA are subject to the same requirements as petroleum UST systems, except that hazardous substance tanks must have secondary containment and interstitial monitoring. That means hazardous substance USTs must meet the same requirements as petroleum USTs concerning correct installation, spill, overll and corrosion protection, corrective action, and closure.

DE MINIMIS CONCENTRATION?

But another wrinkle may come into play in determining whether CERCLA will apply to UST systems containing DEF.

The federal rules exempt from federal UST regulations “any tank system that contains a de minimis concentration of regulated substances.” Rather than dening de minimis, the rules permit EPA to determine de minimis levels on a case-by-case basis. In the past, EPA has used the de minimis exception to exempt materials with very small, trace amounts of hazardous substances.

Since the amount of ammonia present in DEF USTs is very small, it is very possible that EPA will determine the level of ammonia would be regarded as de minimis and therefore exempt from federal UST regulations.

The industry has two other things going for it which may lead EPA to exempt DEF. First, the DEF manufacturers and others are very concerned not only with incompatible equipment materials causing the DEF to degrade and/or be contaminated, but also with DEF causing corrosion or somehow reducing the integrity of the equipment that can cause risk to the environment.
That, coupled with the willingness of various groups within the DEF community to insist on secondarily contained underground tank systems with interstitial monitors, might help the decision makers at EPA determine that the environmental risk from DEF USTs will be minimized, even absent EPA regulations.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

The ball is now in EPA’s court. EPA is in the process of developing an official interpretation on whether DEF USTs will qualify for the de minimis exemption. We anticipate an answer soon—most likely this summer—but we don’t have one yet. Once EPA issues its interpretation, PEI will let you know.

Please note: As with ASTs, state UST regulations may be more stringent than EPA’s. Check your state’s UST regulations before installing an UST containing DEF. State UST program contact information is available at EPA’s website www.epa.gov/oust/states/statcon1.htm.

Rick Long is a lawyer and the General Manager of PEI.

Excellent Article by the PEI.

DEF Gauge for AST’s

http://www.ksentry.com/thermaallss.htm

New Vermont Above Ground Storage Tank Installation Regulations and Solutions

Vermont’s Above Ground Storage Tank Rules

What is required for new tank installations?
All new tank installations must have….
http://www.vermontfuel.com/ASTfaqs_files/VTsabovegroundstoragetankregs.pdf
Krueger Sentry Gauge can fill the needs for the a vent alarm or “whistle” that terminates near the fill pipe and the gauging device.
Our most versatile liquid level site gauge is the Type H Therma Gauge
liquid level sight gauge
Add our Remote Audible Whistle Alarm to the gauge and you are good to go.